Knowledgebase
Knowledgebase: Network
Configuring Secondary Netblock as a routed network
Posted by Dylan K, Last modified by Dylan K on 28 December 2016 06:34 PM

Here at BudgetVM we are constantly striving to improve our services and product offerings so that we can deliver the best experience possible. Upgrades to our equipment is a necessary step in the process of accomplishing this. While upgrading this equipment we are going to be optimizing and improving the way our network operates.

This will not impact your service availability at all however it will adjust the way in which you configure your networking for add-on IP allocations. Your primary allocations will not need to be altered. These adjustments will not change the connection to our equipment and will help to improve the connection to your server. We will be providing you guides on how to make these changes for your specific operating system and our support team will be available to you throughout the whole process.

Example of Allocations needing change:

Your server comes with a base allocation of 5 IPs.  For the example default IP allocation of 10.0.0.2 – 10.0.0.6 the gateway is one IP less than the first usable IPs.  In this case, the gateway is 10.0.0.1. This allocation and configuration will remain the same.

If you have ordered additional allocations for your service your gateway for those IPs will now be the gateway for your default IP allocation. For example, an add-on IP block of 10.0.1.2 – 10.0.1.6 previously had gateway of 10.0.1.1. This also applies to any further allocations associated with the service.  In this example your additional blocks gateway would now be 10.0.0.1.

 

Windows Server 2003, 2008, 2012

These operating systems will not require any changes on your end and will continue to use the existing configurations already in place

 

Linux / Unix based operating systems.

Redhat, CentOS, Fedora

The networking files are located in

/etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/

Example Network file names

Ifcfg-eth1
                ifcfg-enp0s1

Note: the last number in the file name is associated with the number of the physical NIC in the server. Eth1 = Lan1, eth2 = Lan2, and so on.

 

 

Example Network File (Note: yours may look different, you only need to edit about the highlighted yellow line starting with "GATEWAY=".)

DEVICE=eth0
BOOTPROTO=none

ONBOOT=yes

NETWORK="10.0.0.0"

NETMASK="255.255.255.248"

IPADDR="10.0.0.2"

GATEWAY="10.0.0.1"

USERCTL=no

 

The yellow highlighted line is where you will change the IP address from the current gate way to your primary IP allocation’s gateway.

 

Debian, Ubuntu, and others


The network interfaces file is located in

                /etc/network/interfaces

Example Network File (Note: yours may look different, you only need to edit about the highlighted yellow line starting with "GATEWAY=".)

     auto lo

     iface lo inet loopback

 

     auto eth0

     allow-hotplug eth0

     iface eth0 inet static

          address 10.0.0.2

          netmask 255.255.255.248

          gateway 10.0.0.1

 

 

The yellow highlighted line is where you will change the IP address from the current gate way to your primary IP allocation’s gateway.

 

If you are having any issues configuring the network please feel free to contact our support department at any time. 


Comments (0)